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As Pandemic Creates Growing Lone Worker Force, Knightscope ASRs Respond to Security Needs

  • The novel coronavirus has spawned a number of health-preserving policies, including growing use of remote workplace models to keep employees from close contact with each other
  • Lone workers without the immediate physical support of their colleagues may face heightened vulnerability to outside threats, however
  • Company facilities may also face heightened vulnerability because of skeleton crew reductions
  • Autonomous security robots (“ASRs”) such as those developed by Knightscope can help reduce vulnerabilities through property patrols at the workplace and in public places ranging from parks to parking garages

Autonomous security robot (“ASR”) visionaries at Knightscope are advancing their mission to “make the United States of America the safest country in the world” by producing solutions that don’t sleep, don’t fall ill during a pandemic, and don’t succumb to performance-inhibiting factors such as boredom when things appear to be relatively quiet.

Knightscope’s ASR sentries are a friendly, weaponless presence serving clients ranging from the private sector to federal government, proving its use not through interdiction but through detection and allowing its human security partners to determine where to take things from there.

The ASRs’ detection capabilities cover a wide range of potential — monitoring signal transmissions that might communicate the launch of a physical threat, heat sources that might indicate a fire still in embryo, human presences that are unexpected or unauthorized, and specific identification features that might be used as clues to solve criminal cases, for example.

The Las Vegas Review-Journal recently reported the company’s success in serving a metropolitan apartment complex with a history of significant criminal activity, noting that the complex has become “a quieter, more peaceful place to live” since a Knightscope ASR was deployed there last fall and helped reduce the incidence of crime and vandalism (https://ibn.fm/oCj0D).

Security concerns are as pressing as ever in the era of the COVID pandemic, when companies are relying heavily on distributed workforce models that help employees maintain their health and wellbeing by working from a remote base outside the office.

Trade magazine Security recently observed that the pandemic has created more “lone workers” than ever, defined as “individuals who work alone without close or direct supervision, and are often more vulnerable to risks that many office-based workers may not experience.” The magazine commented that, “Organizations in charge of protecting lone workers must fulfill their duty of care, taking all steps reasonably possible to ensure the safety, well-being and physical and mental health of their employees,” with the consequence of inaction being that critical employees may become vulnerable to harm and leave the company itself vulnerable to harm as well (https://ibn.fm/HRREQ).

Those vulnerabilities can occur at the remote locations, where workers may find themselves exposed to dangerous influences without having other supportive staffers nearby to provide help, or at the company’s physical facilities, where a skeleton crew of employees may be unable to sufficiently respond to an attack on the business’s infrastructure, Security states.

Understaffed security forces have “been forced into lone worker scenarios and are suffering from a lack of support resources. They cannot just watch people as they used to, as they’re tasked to do an impossible job of dealing with guest requests, front desk work by checking people in and out, while still responsible for overseeing perimeter security and the monitoring of visitors,” Karl Perman, president and co-founder of risk consultancy CIP CORE, told the magazine.

Perman suggested that organizations can’t afford to operate under the same security program that existed before the COVID-19 outbreak.

One potential solution is Knightscope’s range of autonomous robot sentries, which currently have been deployed in three types of models — one that is stationary within the office complex, one equipped to rove the office building with obstacle avoidance a part of its basic programming, and a third that is capable of patrolling the property outside the office complex.

“A violent crime occurs every four seconds and a property crime every 25 seconds. … Crime has more than a trillion-dollar negative economic impact on the U.S. every single year,” Knightscope founder and CEO William Santana Li says in a recent YouTube video about him and the company (https://ibn.fm/QiMpO), adding in another video, “Each (Knightscope robot) proudly displays the stars and stripes, signifying our patriotic duty to our country” (https://ibn.fm/oNWic).

Knightscope has exceeded 20,000 investors since rolling out its first autonomous product in 2015, utilizing a Reg A+ offering that allows Knightscope to attract private investments without establishing a public IPO (https://ibn.fm/kzbP9).

For more information, visit the company’s website at www.Knightscope.com.

Visit www.Knightscope.com/invest for a summary of Knightscope as an investment, with a blue Instant Messaging button for direct contact with their CEO.

DISCLAIMER: You should read the Offering Circular and risks related to this offering before investing. This Reg A+ offering is made available through StartEngine Primary, LLC. This investment is speculative, illiquid, and involves a high degree of risk, including the possible loss of your entire investment.

NOTE TO INVESTORS: The latest news and updates relating to Knightscope are available in the company’s newsroom at https://ibn.fm/Knight

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